About

Our lives have lots of stories.
And where there is a story, there is often good food.
That’s why this website was started.

Author

Moe Hirohara
Japanese writer & translator, currently based in Berlin.

She is a trained health researcher and an explorer on food and culture.
So, she often writes on food, culinary cultures, health, nourishment, and so on.

If you want to inquire me about writing/translation work, please contact from below.
翻訳/ライティングのお仕事のご相談は下記のコンタクトからどうぞ。

Jump to Japanese/日本語版へ

More about Moe

Here’s a personal story how I became a foodie writer. If you are interested!

Childhood in Japan

Mom often told us “Do not waste your food”.
As she cooked everything well, it was not difficult for me to eat everything on my plate.
So, I have grown up with a good appetite. In my school days, classmates used to call me “big eater”. College friends made jokes on my large stomach as “bottomless pond”.
Those were not the prettiest nicknames, but thanks to them, I got to start an interesting quest afterwards.

Encountering the book on food for living

When I was 16 years old, I read a book called “Mono Kuu Hitobito (What People Eat)” by a Japanese author Yo Henmi. The book was about what people, who are living with poverty in different countries, eat. I was moved by stories of poor men who flock around scraps of neighbour’s wedding feast in Bangladesh and an old woman who lives on vegetables from her garden affected by Chernobyl accident.
Besides being shocked by those stories, I got fascinated by how humans can be fearless to maintain their lives. I felt that eating, indeed, is an act of pursuing life. And, I got interested in people overseas, how they live, and what they eat.

Travelling around and studying in Scotland

Since college, I started to travel. In Ethiopia, I learned that people eat Injera, sour flat bread made from fermented grain. And in a Himalayan village in Nepal, I learnt that fresh Buffalo milk tastes just like mozzarella. Still, my desire for learning the lives of foreign countries.

After college, while I was working in Tokyo for some years, I started to applying for universities abroad. Then, I got a chance to study in Edinburgh, Scotland. So I quit my job and flew out of Japan.
I joined a postgraduate course for public health. It’s a field of study that deals with different health issues in different countries around the world.

At first glance, the city of Edinburgh was just pretty and peaceful, surrounded by miles of hills where hairy cows graze. However, I was told in the class that a high rate of heart disease was the main health concern here. The reason for this is a diet high in sweets and fried foods.
In fact, I was overwhelmed by the variety of biscuits and chocolates, in big packages and with low prices in supermarket shelves. Here, social classes and inequalities prevail. And the weather is cold and harsh. That leads starved people with lower income eat more oil, and more sugar.
It made me realise that our dietary habits largely depends on where we live, which in turn impacts our health, and how much food matters.

Working on farms

As I travelled, I became more interested in how our foods are produced. After completing my studies in Edinburgh, I volunteered on farms in Scotland and France and also worked for an organic vegetable producer in Japan. Working on three farms for some months was not enough to give me a complete picture of food production, but it was enough to give me an idea of the process before we get the vegetables from the supermarket shelves. Farmers (especially small/middle scale) are literally running around, soaked with rains, sweats and dirts, to protect their produces.
I told myself to always think about what’s behind the consumerism, that I benefit from.

And, now

I don’t think I’ll go for a long journey again. I feel I saw enough, and the world gave me much.
Berlin is where I live for a while. Back in the city life. But, I would not forget what I have seen on my travels.
Wherever you live in the world, whatever the circumstances, eating is a moment when people feel peace and happiness. And I think it should continue to be so.
I hope that through writing on something as familiar as food, I can inspire readers to be curious, and feel connected with places and people they don’t know.

Thanks for reading😋

Back to English

詳しいプロフィール

私が食いしん坊ライターになるまでの生い立ち。興味持ってくれる人は見てってね!

幼少時代

神奈川県横浜市の平凡な家庭の次女として生まれる。
母親には「食べ物を無駄にするな」とよく言われた。母の料理は美味しかったし、常に残すことなく食べ、食欲旺盛に育った。
十代になると、私の胃袋はさらに成長を速めた。中高時代にではクラスメイトに「食いしん坊」の称号を与えられ、大学時代の友人たちは、私の胃袋を「(底なしの)沼のようだね」と笑った。
うら若き乙女に喜ばしいあだ名では決してなかったけれど、その十何年後かに、面白い旅ができたのは、この貪欲な胃袋のおかげでもある。

「食」×「生」を綴った本との出会い

16歳の時、辺見庸の『もの喰う人びと』という本を読んだ。この本には、世界各地で貧困の中に生きる人たちが何を食べているのか、著者が実際に取材した内容が書かれている。
隣人の結婚式の食べ残しに群がるバングラデシュの男たちや、原発事故後もチェルノブイリに住み続け、汚染の危険性のある自分の庭の野菜を食べて生きる老婆など、極限状態でも何とか食べて生きていこうとする人々の姿が描かれている。
衝撃を受けた一方で、「人は生きるために、ここまでやれるんだな」と妙に感心した。
食べることとは、「生」を追求する行為なのだと。
そして、海の向こうの知らない土地の人たちが何を食べ、どのように生きているのかを見てみたいという気持ちが強まっていった。

旅、そしてスコットランド留学

大学生になってから旅を始めた。東アフリカエチオピアでは、インジェラという、発酵した穀物から作る酸っぱいクレープが主食であるということを知り、ネパールの山中では、新鮮な水牛の乳が味がモッツアレラそのものだということを知った。
それでも、異国の生活を知りたいという気持ちは収まらなかった。大学を卒業し、東京で数年間働く中で、海外の大学院にアプライし続け、イギリスはスコットランドのエジンバラ大学にアクセプトされる。それで、仕事を辞めて日本を飛び発った。

大学院では、世界の国ごとに異なる健康問題について考える、Public Health(公衆衛生学)という分野を学んだ。

毛むくじゃらの牛が草を食む広大な丘陵地帯に囲まれたエジンバラの街は、一見すると平和だ。
でも、心臓病にかかる人の割合が多いと大学で聞かされた。その原因は、甘いものと揚げ物の多い食習慣。実際スーパーに行くと、ビスケットなどのお菓子類の種類の多さ、サイズの大きさ、値段の安さに圧倒される。経済格差が蔓延するイギリス。その中でも寒さの厳しいスコットランド。お金のない人ほど、おなかを満たすために粗悪な油と砂糖に手が伸びてしまう。
住む環境によって食生活が変わり、ひいては人の健康も左右することを実感し、食べることの重要さに改めて気づかされた。

農場で働く

旅をするほどに、食べ物がどのように生産されているのか見てみたいという興味も湧いてきた。大学院での勉強を終えた後、スコットランドとフランスの農家でボランティアをし、日本の有機野菜農家でも半年間働いた。数週間から数ヶ月間、三か所の農場で働いただけでは、農業の一通りを知っているとは言えないけれど、スーパーの野菜が棚に並ぶまでの過程に何があるのかを知るには十分だった。農家の人達(特に小・中規模農家)は、汗と雨と土にまみれて、文字通り走り回って働く。
自分が恩恵を受ける消費文化の裏側で、何が起きているかを常に考えるようにしたいと思った。

そして、現在

もう、長い旅をすることは、ないだろうと思う。十分見てきたと感じるし、世界が色々なものを与えてくれたと思う。
当面の拠点はヨーロッパの大都市ベルリン。でも、旅して見てきたことを忘れないようにしながら生活したい。
世界のどこに住んでいても、どんな状況であっても、「食べる」という行為には、人々が平和と幸せを感じる瞬間があると思う。そして、これからもそうであり続けなければいけないと思う。
食べ物という分かりやすいものを通して、読む人の、「知らない場所・あったことのない人を思いやる想像力」が広がればいいな、とひそやかに願っている。

Thanks for reading😋